Camping Knots

Have you ever wanted to learn how to tie Camping Knots?

In this knot tutorial video, Jason demonstrates how to tie 14 great camping knots that you can easily learn and are perfect for bushcraft and wilderness survival skills.

The knots included in the video include:

  • Half Hitch,
  • Two Half Hitches,
  • Square Knot,
  • Clove Hitch,
  • Slip Clove Hitch,
  • Taut Line,
  • Figure Eight Knot,
  • Bowline,
  • Alpine Butterfly Knot,
  • Sheet Bend,
  • Double Sheet Bend,
  • Prusik,
  • Constrictor Knot,
  • Canoeman’s Knot (aka the Highwayman’s Knot).

These knots are demonstrated the way I learned them.

Camping Knots

Learning how to Tie Knots

Learning how to tie knots can be a very easy thing to do that will improve your camping and bushcraft skills. 

What we suggest is that you pick one new knot to learn each week for four weeks. By the end of the month you’ll have four new knots under belt. Camping knots are something that you really do need to practice or you’ll likely forget how to tie them. 

Here are the knots that we believe are the most important camping knots to learn. You can pick from these few knots to learn the one you think you’ll use the most.

The Bowline Knot


The Bowline is a classic and simple knot used to form a reasonably secure fixed loop at the end of a rope. In my opinion the Bowline is one of the top 3 most important knots for bushcraft and wilderness skills or wilderness survival.

Its a knot thats easy to tie and untie; and in some ways more importantly its easy to untie even after being subjected to a heavy load.

A lot of people will remember the Bowline Knot by the little mnemonic used to teach to teach it. Its the “Rabbit and the Tree” rhyme.

First imagine the end of the rope as a rabbit, and where the knot will begin on the standing part, a tree trunk. First a loop is made near the end of the rope, which will act as the rabbit’s hole. Then the “rabbit” comes up the hole, goes round the tree right to left, and then back down the hole.

The Clove Hitch

 

The Clove Hitch is an easy all purpose hitch knot that’s both easy to tie and untie. It’s a good binding knot that’s often used to start lashing knots.

A bit of care should be taken when using the Clove Hitch Knot because it can slip or become undone, especially if constant pressure isn’t maintained on the line.

The Clove Hitch is often considered one of the first three knots you should learn and is taught as a camping knot and also a Scouts Knot. So, its an ideal knot for bushcraft and wilderness skills or wilderness survival.

If you’re looking for a stronger knot that won’t slip, we highly recommend you check out the Constrictor Knot, which is tied almost identically to the Clove Hitch.

The Tautline

The Tautline is a knot that creates an adjustable loop in the end of a rope. It’s typically used for securing tent and tarp lines, and so, its an ideal knot for bushcraft and wilderness skills or wilderness survival.

The Tauline Hitch is relatively easy to tie or untie under load and even after being heavily loaded its reasonably easy to release.

The Sheetbend

The Sheet Bend is a knot that is used to join two pieces of rope, paracord or other working line. It’s an easy knot to learn and can be used to extend the length of a line used for tarp lines, etc. So, its an ideal knot for bushcraft and wilderness skills or wilderness survival.

The Sheet Bend is very easy to tie or untie and even after being heavily loaded its reasonably easy to release.

The Alpine Butterfly

Building on our video series of Bushcraft knots, in this Alpine Butterfly Knot tutorial Jason demonstrates how to tie the Alpine Butterfly Knot & Alpine Butterfly Bend Bend.

The Alpine Butterfly Loop, also known as the Lineman’s Loop is used to tie a fixed loop in a piece of rope.

The Alpine Butterfly Bend is a knot that is used to join two pieces of rope, paracord or other working line.

Both knots are easy to learn and in this video Jason demonstrates the easiest way to tie an Alpine Butterfly Loop and two ways to tie the Alpine Butterfly Bend.